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Coffin-Lowry Syndrome and Social Security Disability

Coffin-Lowry Syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a gene on the X chromosome which is essential to protein formation used in long-term memory formation, causing intellectual disability. It is a rare disorder and in many cases, affected individuals have no family history of Coffin-Lowry. The condition typically affects males more severely than females. Females may exhibit more of a range of severity in symptoms, from mild to severe.

Coffin-Lowry Syndrome is associated with several physical abnormalities, particularly in the head and face. These include spread apart eyes, a prominent forehead, short nose, and wide mouth—all placed on a small head. Those affected with Coffin-Lowry are also likely to be shorter in stature with increased spine curvature and have short fingers. In some cases, sudden loud noises can cause someone with Coffin-Lowry to collapse. Other individuals may be more susceptible to cardiac problems.

At this time, there is no cure or standard treatment regimen for Coffin-Lowry Syndrome. In many cases, an individual will be prescribed an individual program of physical, speech, and occupational therapies to manage the symptoms.

Applying for Social Security Disability Benefits with Coffin-Lowry Syndrome

In order to qualify for disability benefits, an applicant must match specific criteria for their medical condition, which is compiled by the Social Security Administration (SSA) in a guide called the blue book. An applicant can also qualify by meeting the listing for an associated symptom. In this case, Section 100.00 (1.00 Adults) Growth Impairments, 104.00 (4.00 Adults) Cardiovascular disorders, and 112.00 (12.00 Adults) Mental Disorders may all be met by someone with Coffin-Lowry Syndrome.

The evaluation period for a disability claim can take several months, but Coffin-Lowry Syndrome is also eligible for an expedited application process called compassionate allowances.

Compassionate allowances are not a separate program from Social Security Disability benefit programs, but the program serves to pay benefits quickly to those who have advanced and obvious medical disabilities. You can expect to be approved for benefits in around a month under the compassionate allowances program.

The Application

Before you begin the application, gather all of the required documentation, as well as any additional medical information that might help your case. Have your medical records, including diagnosis and treatments, doctor's notes, and definitive lab results. Applications can be initiated by scheduling an appointment with a Social Security Representative or by filling out the online forms. Applications for children must be begun during an in person interview.

In the event your application is denied, there is an appeals process. You must complete the appeal within 60 days of receiving the denial. You must be as detailed as possible about your condition your you may not be approved. You will likely have to treat the application process like a job to improve chances of qualifying. There are also many disability advocates and attorneys who specialize in the Social Security disability application who can help you prepare and present your claim if you have any trouble.