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Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy and Social Security Disability

This year alone, the Social Security Administration is expected to receive more than three million applications for Social Security Disability benefits. Many of these applications are submitted by parents of children who have been diagnosed with severely debilitating conditions. In the past these parents had to undergo the standard Social Security Disability claim and appeal process, and in the best of circumstances these parents would receive an approval of their child's benefit in just three to four months. In most cases, these parents had to undergo the lengthy and complicated appeal process in order to obtain Social Security Disability benefits for their child – a process that takes some applicants more than two years to complete.

In 2008, the Social Security Administration (SSA) finally recognized the fact that some disability applicants simply cannot endure such extensive periods of time prior to an approval of their Social Security Disability claims. To address this concern, they rolled out the Compassionate Allowances initiative, which allows certain disability applicants to be approved for Social Security Disability benefits in a matter of weeks rather than having to wait months or years for benefits to begin. Patients who have been diagnosed with Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy are among those who qualify for expedited claim handling under these guidelines.

If your child has been diagnosed with Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy and you are wondering how his or her claim for disability benefits will be processed by the Social Security Administration, the following information can help you to better understand both the application process and what you can do to increase your chances of receiving a quick approval of your child's claim under the SSA's Compassionate Allowances guidelines.

Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy - Condition and Symptoms

Congenital muscular dystrophy can be categorized into two different types, including Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy and Merosin Positive Congenital Muscular Dystrophy. Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy is one of the most severe types of muscular dystrophy that an individual can suffer from.

Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy is thought to be caused by a mutation of the LAMA 2 gene. Babies who are diagnosed with the condition lack either some or all of the normal merosin muscle protein found in the body. The severity of the symptoms will depend the extent of the child’s merosin deficiency.

The symptoms of Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy can vary from patient to patient, but common symptoms of the condition include reduced muscle tone and general muscle weakness in the legs, arms and torso. Delayed motor development, breathing difficulties, and brain abnormalities that appear on an MRI may also be present. Symptoms of Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy will usually present themselves either at birth or shortly thereafter.

If a doctor suspects that a baby has been born with the condition, a variety of tests can be performed to diagnose Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy. Common tests include an MRI of the brain, muscle biopsy, genetic testing, serum creatine kinase concentration testing, and immunostaining of the muscle. Unfortunately, there is no cure for the condition, and treatments focus on alleviating the symptoms of the disorder through procedures including physiotherapy, ventilator support, and tracheotomy in severe cases.

Filing for Social Security Disability with Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

When a child receives a diagnosis of Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy, it can be both emotionally and financially overwhelming. In some cases, one parent may need to stop working to be at home with the child. In almost all cases, disability-related medical expenses put added financial stress on the family. Fortunately, Social Security Disability benefits may be able to help.

When your child receives a diagnosis of Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy, you should file a Social Security Disability claim as soon as possible. The sooner you apply for your child's benefits, the sooner you will be able to receive assistance from the Social Security Administration.

When completing the disability application, make sure you provide complete and thorough answers to each question asked. You also need to provide as much medical evidence as possible with your Social Security Disability application, including test results, treatment histories, and written statements from treating physicians.

Your Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Social Security Disability Case

Many of the individuals who file claims for children based on a diagnosis of Merosin Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy assume that the application will be automatically approved by the Social Security Administration due to the severity of their child's condition, but this is not always the case. While it is uncommon, the SSA will occasionally deny a claim that is based on a Compassionate Allowances listing. This is usually due to an application that has been submitted improperly, or a lack of supporting medical evidence. In some cases, the adjudicator reviewing the file may not be familiar with the Compassionate Allowances listings and how the condition qualifies for special consideration from the Social Security Administration.

You should do everything possible to avoid the lengthy and stressful disability appeal process, which can result in a further delay of your child's Social Security Disability benefits. In order to do this, you may want to consider retaining the services of a qualified disability attorney or advocate. These professionals can help you gather the medical evidence needed to support your claim and will help you prepare your application in such a way that the adjudicator reviewing your file understands how your child's condition qualifies under the Compassionate Allowances listings.