You are here

Blogs

How Severe Does my Arthritis Need to be to Qualify?

How severe does my arthritis have to be to get disability benefits?

Social Security disability insurance (SSDI) currently benefits millions of Americans and their families. However, many people who could benefit from the program are either unsure that they qualify or are intimidated by the process.

To see if your arthritis could qualify for SSDI, we must first understand how disabilities are evaluated

The “Blue Book”

August: Spinal Muscular Atrophy Awareness Month

Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) can affect anyone. It is the leading genetic cause of death in children under 2 years old and affects up to 1 in every 6,000 people. And yet, many have never even heard of this disease.

August is SMA Awareness Month. To do your part, continue below to learn about SMA and how you can make a difference for those affected.

What is Spinal Muscular Atrophy?

SMA is a genetic disease that affects the nervous system, specifically the parts of the body that control voluntary movement.

Future Changes in SSDI/SSI Benefits?

Social Security has benefitted hundreds of millions of Americans since its start in 1935. From retirees to those suffering from debilitating disabilities, Social Security provides monthly funds to ensure as many people as possible have sufficient means to live. For many Americans, however, there is great worry about the future of the Social Security program.

Will there be any changes in the SSDI/SSI benefits program in the future?

Will SSDI Replace My Work-Related Income I Lost?

SSDI is a safety net for disabled workers and their families. These benefits offer financial support to help cover everyday living expenses and other costs when you’re unable to work due to severe physical and/or mental limitations.

Although SSDI can be a significant sum, it may or may not provide you the same amount of income each month to which you’ve been accustomed. It really depends on how much you earned when you were able to work prior to becoming disabled.

Should I Get Unemployment or Disability?

When you’re out of work with a serious medical condition, it can be difficult to know just how to proceed. Disability benefits are one option and provide qualified workers and their families a level of financial security, even when income from employment is limited or nonexistent. Another option, dependent upon your specific circumstances, is to apply for unemployment benefits instead and decide later whether your disability is so severe that it will stop you from finding a new job.

SSA Benefits and Length of Disability

Why Might I Have to Apply in Person?

Disability benefits provide essential support for disabled individuals and often their immediate family members or dependents. These benefits can actually come in two forms: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

For SSI, a personal interview with an Social Security Administration (SSA) representative is a standard part of the process, but applying in person for SSDI can potentially increase your chances of approval, or at least decrease the chances of unnecessary delays with your claim.

What Types of Extra Financial Support Can I Get?

Disability benefits can keep you afloat when an impairment prevents you from working to support yourself and your family. The average wait for a decision on eligibility is between three and four months, but some applicants wait significantly longer. Getting by in the mean time often means seeking out other forms of support.

Common Mistakes Disability Applicants Make

When approved for disability, applicants often receive a lump sum of “back pay,” and then get monthly benefits through automatic payments moving forward. Benefits through the Social Security Administration’s (SSA’s) disability programs can take the pressure off of individuals and families that are faced with serious medical concerns and the financial worries that come with them.

Avoiding Common Social Security Application Mistakes

What Happens to my Disability Benefits After Going to Jail?

The Social Security Administration’s (SSA’s) disability programs provide essential income for disabled individuals, and in some cases, also pay dependent or auxiliary benefits to family members of the disabled. These benefits become a cornerstone of family finances when a wage earner is no longer able to work due to disability. Families come to depend on this income to meet their everyday needs, but what happens when a disability recipient goes to jail?

Social Security Disability Eligibility when Sentenced to Jail Time

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs