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December 1 Marks World AIDS Day

People worldwide who have been affected by AIDS are taking note of World AIDS Day, which falls on December 1st. Whether you’re an AIDS patient or someone who supports someone with the illness, it’s your chance to join together in the fight against AIDS and its precursor, HIV. It’s also a great time to remember those with AIDS who’ve died since the beginning of the epidemic.

July: National Cord Blood Awareness Month

There are thousands of diseases in the United States that still classify as uncured. While there are treatment options available for a majority of these disorders, scientists are working every day to find methods that may be able to cure them. However, recent studies show that that one specific source may hold the answers to a host of medical issues: cord blood.

In preparation for next month’s National Cord Blood Awareness Month, continue below to learn more about cord blood, why it is useful, and how you can help those with still-uncured disorders find the help they need.

Helen Keller Deaf-Blind Awareness Week

Helen Keller was one of the first deaf-blind Americans to break the mold and prove that no disability can prevent a person from living their best life. Despite her disability, Helen Keller went on to become an author, a lecturer, and the first deaf-blind recipient of a Bachelor of Arts degree. As of 1984, the last week of each June is dedicated to Helen Keller and all deaf-blind individuals by spreading awareness of the disorder.

Continue below to learn more about what it means to be deaf-blind and how you can do your part to help those affected by the disorder.

June: Cataracts Awareness Month

More than 200,000 Americans are diagnosed with cataracts every year. However, even with its prevalence, there are still many misconceptions about what cataracts are, how they are caused, and how they can be treated. Some people with early cataracts symptoms may even develop a more severe condition because of their lack of knowledge about the disorder at its warning signs.

The ACHA: What You Need to Know

On Thursday, May 4th, the House of Representatives narrowly passed the American Health Care Act, or ACHA. The ACHA is intended to replace “Obamacare,” or the Affordable Care Act. The bill narrowly passed the House with a 217-213 vote, and still has yet to pass the Senate. If the bill does continue as is, the ACHA may affect you or your loved ones if you have a disability. Here are some key points of the ACHA:

Does a Heart Attack Increase My Chances of Approval?

The Social Security Administration’s (SSA’s) rules for disability are strict. Even with a serious heart condition, you may not meet the severity level requirements to receive benefits. If you have a heart attack, then you may now qualify for disability, even if you didn’t before. It really depends on your specific circumstances, including how severe your chronic cardiac condition is and how significant your post-heart attack impairments are.

How Recently Must I have Worked to Qualify for SSDI?

Disability and the loss of income it leads to inevitably affects all aspects of life. It can make money matters exceptionally tight for the entire family. Disability benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA) may relieve at least some of the financial strain. Approval for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) however depends on meeting both the medical and the technical eligibility requirements, and the technical requirements include a relatively recent work history.

What are Some of the Most Common Application Pitfalls?

The Social Security disability application process can be very complicated. Being approved for benefits can be quite a challenge. The approval rate for disability varies from state to state as well as throughout the different levels of the application process, but the national average indicates that about 36% of applicants are approved for benefits.

Do SSA Benefits Vary Based on Cost of Living?

If you are applying for monthly disability benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA), you may wonder if the amount of those benefits may vary based on the current cost of living. The current cost of living can impact your income somewhat, but the way your income is impacted is dependent upon the kinds of benefits you receive for being disabled.

There are two kinds of disability benefits administered by the SSA, one is Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and the other is Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

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