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Cessation of Disability Benefits

When the Social Security Administration determines that you are no longer qualified to receive Social Security Disability benefits, you will be notified of your cessation of disability benefits. As the name implies, a cessation of disability benefits means that the SSA is going to cut off your Social Security Disability benefits unless you successfully appeal.

Generally speaking, your Social Security benefits will not actually be terminated for two months after you receive a notice of cessation of disability benefits. During this time, you have a right to appeal the decision. You may do so in writing, or by requesting a hearing. In either case, you can (and should) have a Social Security Disability lawyer represent you.

To continue receiving Social Security Disability payments during the appeals process, you will need to file a request for a continuation of benefits. This is different and separate from your appeal, and needs to be filed within 10 days of when you receive your notice of cessation of disability benefits.

Usually, a cessation of disability benefits follows a Continuing Disability Review (if the cessation of disability benefits is for medical purposes) or a review of your income and countable assets (if the cessation of disability benefits is for nonmedical purposes). These reviews take place periodically (often annually or every three years). You will be notified when your case is being reviewed.

Before the Social Security Administration can send you a cessation of disability benefits notice, there has to be a documented improvement in your medical condition. In the case of SSI, you can receive a cessation of disability benefits if you accumulate assets worth more than $2,000 or if your income rises above accepted levels.

If you receive a notice of cessation of disability benefits, file an appeal immediately using SSA Form 789. Remember, you have ten days to file an appeal if you want your Social Security Disability benefits to continue during the appeals process.