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Impairment Related Work Expenses

Impairment Related Work Expenses are expenses you incur from the purchase or payment related to special equipment, training, or anything else directly related to your ability to perform work with your impairment. Social Security Disability benefits generally allow you to deduct all impairment related work expenses when reporting your income. The amount paid to cover impairment related work expenses is not counted against you when determining if you are gainfully employed for Social Security Disability purposes. Impairment related work expenses may also be deducted before calculating the amount of your SSI benefit is to be reduced as a result of your income.

Nearly anything which can be demonstrated as being necessary for getting to or from work or performing at work can be declared as an impairment related work expense. Social Security Disability guidelines allow you to include equipment or services which are also used for non-work purposes. Examples of impairment related work expenses which also have personal benefits use include hearing aids and wheel chairs. Either may be necessary for someone with the related disability to function at work, though they are likely used in public and at home as well.

If you are not sure, but suspect that a given piece of equipment or service qualifies as impairment related work expenses, you should claim it. If it is approved, the cost will be deducted from your earnings before calculating disability benefits. If it isn’t accepted, it won’t be deducted, but you will not have lost anything. Your income will continue to be factored in when determining your eligibility for Social Security Disability benefits.

Some common impairment related work expenses generally recognized as claimable for Social Security Disability include medication which affects you’re ability to perform work, routine medical services which affect your ability to work, home modifications which are necessary for you to leave home, prosthetic devices which help you perform work, attendant services performed while you are on the job, added transportation costs incurred as a result of your disabling condition, and even some diagnostic services directly related to finding and maintaining employment.