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Nonexertional Limitations

When an individual applies for Social Security Disability benefits, the limitations that the individual suffers from can be categorized into one of two categories including exertional limitations and nonexertional limitations.

Nonexertional limitations are all limitations, other than strength demands, that limit your ability to meet the demands of a job. According to the Social Security Administration, some examples of nonexertional limitations include mental disorders (such as nervousness, anxiety, depression or bipolar disorder), difficulty concentrating, difficulty understanding or remembering detailed instructions, difficulties with sight or hearing, difficulty tolerating the physical demands of certain work settings (such as problems tolerating fumes or dust) or difficulty performing the postural functions of certain types of work.

A person may qualify for Social Security Disability benefits if they only suffer from nonexertional limitations. It may be difficult, however, to prove such nonexertional limitations to the Social Security Administration in order to qualify for disability benefits. In order to do so you will either need to present your initial disability application in a convincing manner during the initial stage of the application process or will need to pursue a Social Security Disability appeal.

If you do need to appeal a denied Social Security Disability claim due to the fact that it can be hard to prove nonexertional limitations, you should consider retaining the services of a Social Security Disability attorney. These professionals can help you gather the objective medical evidence that will be needed to prove your disability. Your attorney can also ensure that there are vocational experts who can testify in regards to the extent of your nonexertional limitations and how those limitations result in an inability to work. As a result, your chances of obtaining the Social Security Disability benefits you need can be significantly increased.