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December 1 Marks World AIDS Day

People worldwide who have been affected by AIDS are taking note of World AIDS Day, which falls on December 1st. Whether you’re an AIDS patient or someone who supports someone with the illness, it’s your chance to join together in the fight against AIDS and its precursor, HIV. It’s also a great time to remember those with AIDS who’ve died since the beginning of the epidemic.

September: Spinal Cord Injury Awareness

Spinal Cord Injuries, Disability Benefits, and You

There are 17,000 new cases of spinal cord injuries each year. Each case is unique and affects the person’s life in a different way--for example, some people may have more limited mobility than others do based on how their injury occurred.

These injuries are most often a result of a car accident, but they can also occur due to falls and acts of violence. No matter how they happen, spinal cord injuries can alter a person’s life forever.

World Lymphoma Awareness Day

Lymphoma Social Security Disability Benefits and You

As far as holidays go, September 15th may not ring a bell to a lot of people, even though it’s a day used to spread awareness of a well-known condition. Every year on September 15th, the world celebrates Lymphoma Awareness Day.

It’s an attempt to help people understand this cancer of the lymphocytes (cells that fight off infection) so that people are better-equipped to diagnose themselves early and get themselves to a doctor.

Thyroid Cancer Awareness Month

Thyroid Cancer Awareness Month, Social Security Disability Benefits, and You

In 2017, there were over 56,000 new cases of thyroid cancer in the U.S. and just over 2,000 deaths from it. Compared to other cancers, there hasn’t been a particularly dramatic change in the number of cases, but that doesn’t mean that people should ignore it. If anything, the fact that this cancer often flies under the radar makes it dangerous because people may be lulled into a false sense of security.

Why Doctors are Crucial When Applying for Disability Benefits

A good doctor is always necessary regardless of whether or not you apply for benefits. However, the Social Security system relies heavily on official medical evidence when determining disability. Without the help of a trusted physician, the application becomes extremely difficult.

Below are the top three reasons why working with a physician is necessary when applying for benefits.

How to Know if Your Condition is “Disabling Enough”

Receiving disability benefits can be life-changing for many Americans living with severe disorders. Unfortunately, applying for disability benefits can be a struggle. What do you do? How do you know what to prepare? And how do you even know if you qualify in the first place?

Below, we will go over the basics regarding disability qualification and what you can do to make the application process as painless as possible.

How to Find a Physician if You Don’t Have One

Physicians are an invaluable resource when you are dealing with a disorder of any kind. There is no substitute for their consistent check-ups, medical tests, prescriptions, and suggestions. However, on top of this, physicians are even more important when applying for disability benefits.

Continue below to learn why physicians make all the difference when filling out your application, and how you can begin looking for a doctor near you.

July: National Cord Blood Awareness Month

There are thousands of diseases in the United States that still classify as uncured. While there are treatment options available for a majority of these disorders, scientists are working every day to find methods that may be able to cure them. However, recent studies show that that one specific source may hold the answers to a host of medical issues: cord blood.

In preparation for next month’s National Cord Blood Awareness Month, continue below to learn more about cord blood, why it is useful, and how you can help those with still-uncured disorders find the help they need.

How to Qualify for Social Security Disability Benefits with the Blue Book

Social Security disability benefits provide financial assistance for millions of Americans each year. In order to qualify, applicants must show that their disability is severe enough to prevent them from working or living independently.

Because of Social Security’s in-depth application process, it can be tricky to figure out how to qualify. Below, we will show you how you can measure your medical qualifications by comparing your diagnosis to the Blue Book.

How the Blue Book Works

Disability applicants qualify as disabled when they can show that their condition:

Helen Keller Deaf-Blind Awareness Week

Helen Keller was one of the first deaf-blind Americans to break the mold and prove that no disability can prevent a person from living their best life. Despite her disability, Helen Keller went on to become an author, a lecturer, and the first deaf-blind recipient of a Bachelor of Arts degree. As of 1984, the last week of each June is dedicated to Helen Keller and all deaf-blind individuals by spreading awareness of the disorder.

Continue below to learn more about what it means to be deaf-blind and how you can do your part to help those affected by the disorder.

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