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May is Stroke Awareness Month

Each year over 133,000 Americans die as a result of a stroke injury. What makes this number so devastating is that the vast majority of strokes are preventable. Strokes are the leading cause of disability in the United States.

Depending on the type and severity, it’s entirely possible that individuals who have experienced a stroke are no longer able to work. If this is the case for you, you may qualify for Social Security Disability benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA).

How Can I Prepare for the ALJ’s Questions at a Hearing?

If you have applied for Social Security Disability and have been denied, you have the right to appeal the Social Security Administration’s decision. The first step of the appeal process is to request a reconsideration. The claimant will receive a new ruling by someone who had no part in the first decision. Should you still disagree with the decision, you have the right to request a hearing before an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ).

What is an RFC and Why Should I Obtain One from My Doctor?

The process of applying for Social Security Disability is complex. The most straightforward way to win an award for your disabling illness is to meet the listing criteria of a particular condition in the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) Blue Book. However, many individuals do not meet a Blue Book listing, despite being severely disabled.

What is the Role of a Social Security Disability Attorney?

The Social Security disability application process can be overwhelming, especially during a time that your health is suffering. While you are not required to hire a lawyer who specializes in Social Security disability cases, you will likely find it to be extremely beneficial.

A Social Security disability attorney has experience dealing with the Social Security Administration (SSA) and, as a result, is very skilled at handling the various issues that may arise throughout the application process.

Differences Between Social Security and LTD

If you become disabled, you may be covered by a long-term disability (LTD) insurance plan. Long-term disability is an insurance policy that protects individuals from loss of income when they are unable to work due to an injury or an illness. Sometimes described as “income replacement,” long-term disability typically goes into effect after short-term disability has been exhausted.

When is the Right Time to Hire a Disability Lawyer or Advocate?

If you have been diagnosed with a medical condition that is hindering your ability to work, you may be wondering about the Social Security Disability application process. Perhaps you have already taken the steps necessary to get the ball rolling. Regardless of where you are in the process, enlisting the help of an experienced Social Security Attorney or Disability Advocate is always a good idea.

The Importance of Obtaining Medical Records for my SSDI claim

Social Security Disability claims are won or lost on medical evidence. Your ability to provide timely and accurate medical documentation to the Social Security Administration (SSA) may make the difference between winning your claim or losing it. Therefore, it is critical that you ensure that all of your medical records are submitted for your Social Security claim.

While you do not have to submit all of your medical records personally, there are definite steps that you can take to help guarantee that all of your medical evidence arrives and makes it into your case record.

What If My Disabling Condition Isn't In the Blue Book?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) uses a medical guide, known as the Blue Book, to determine whether or not a condition is severe enough to warrant disability payments. The Blue Book is also often referred to as the Listing of Impairments.

Each condition in the Blue Book lists specific criteria and symptoms that you must have to be approved.

However, with thousands of variations of conditions, it is impossible to list them all in one place. Therefore, only the most common and severe impairments are listed in the Blue Book.

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