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June is Scoliosis Awareness Month

Scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity, affecting approximately 3% of the US population. Although it is typically diagnosed in the pre-adolescent and adolescent years, scoliosis can also occur as an infant or an older adult.

The severity of scoliosis varies from person to person. While the majority of individuals with scoliosis experience only minor effects on their health, some people have such significant cases that their spinal deformity affects their breathing and causes great pain.

Do Multiple Disabilities Improve the Odds of Receiving Benefits?

Individuals applying for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits often have several health conditions, or co-morbidities, that may factor into their overall health. For example, an individual who requires an amputation due to peripheral vascular disease, might also have uncontrolled diabetes.

What is the Timeline for my Social Security Disability Claim?

For individuals who have become disabled and are unable to work as a result of their health condition, Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits can be a financial lifesaver.

Unfortunately, for many people, the application and approval process can be excruciatingly long. Facing an uncertain amount of time without income can create additional anxiety for individuals already trying to get well.

3 Mistakes to Avoid When Completing a Disability Application

Each year, millions of people apply for financial assistance from the Social Security Administration (SSA) due to a significant health condition that limits their ability to work. While many of these individuals are rightfully disabled and in need of help, only a third of claimants are approved at the initial level of the disability claim process.

What Role Does a Vocational Expert Play in My Disability Claim?

Individuals who have been twice denied disability benefits by the Social Security Administration (SSA) during the initial phases of the application process may request an appeals hearing in front of an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ).

During an appeals hearing, claimants are asked to answer questions about their health condition, as well as about their past employment history, acquired skills, and experience. In a majority of disability cases, the ALJ requests the presence of a vocational expert at the hearing.

What Is the Process for Filing an Appeal If I Am Denied Benefits?

The vast majority of Social Security Disability applicants are initially denied benefits. In fact, claimants have less than a 35% chance of approval during the early stages of the process. Individuals who have been denied benefits do not have to give up hope of obtaining the financial assistance that they so desperately need. Claimants have the option of filing an appeal with the Social Security Administration (SSA).

Are There Any Ways to Speed Up My SSD Appeals Hearing?

Due to the high volume of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) applications that cross the desk of the Social Security Administration (SSA), disability claimants often must wait a substantial amount of time for a decision on their claim.

Those who have already faced denials during the initial application and reconsideration process now await an appeals hearing in front of an administrative law judge (ALJ). The good news is that the majority of disability claims are won at this level.

What is a Consultative Examination for Social Security Disability?

Claimants who apply for financial assistance from the Social Security Administration (SSA) due to a disability may receive a notice to appear at a consultative exam, or CE. A consultative exam is typically requested when there is insufficient medical evidence in your file to determine the existence or severity of a disability. A CE might be required if your treating physician has not thoroughly documented your health condition, if your doctor has not responded to information requests, or if you have not been seen by a medical provider for a considerable amount of time.

How Long Do I Need to be Disabled for Social Security?

The moment that an individual is unable to do a substantial amount of work as a result of a health condition, he or she should apply for Social Security disability benefits. As a result of the high number of disability applicants, the Social Security Administration (SSA) has a backlog of cases, often resulting in substantial wait times. The sooner that an individual applies for financial assistance from the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, the quicker their application will begin to be processed.

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