Qualifying children

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 10/26/2011 - 13:47

I have children and their father has recently went for a hearing is waiting on a decision. I was told that the kids will qualify for benefits. I have several questions.
How is the amount determined?
What are the rules for the cutoff age to recieve benefits?
Do the children recieve back pay as well?
What steps if any do I need to take to set up their case?
If a child is 18 but still in high school do they qualify, and for how long?

Deanna

In reply to by Anonymous (not verified)

Wed, 12/30/2015 - 10:05 Permalink

Hi Jenny,
I believe I tried to answer your question earlier. So your younger son should be entitled to $700, which is 50% of your benefit. Your older son was receiving an overpayment because it looks like he's receiving the maximum SSI benefit, so he would not be entitled to SSDI benefits at the same time. If you were to separate, your son would only be entitled to 50% of your husband's payment, which would be just $400. I am baffled as to why your youngest isn't receiving $700. The only thing I can think of is that the SSA is docking his payment due to your older son's overpayment. Have you scheduled an appointment with your local SSA office?

Nicole (not verified)
Wed, 12/30/2015 - 13:44 Permalink

I'm currently at the reconsideration level. Does the decision normally take as long as the first decision? It took about 5 months for my initial denial.

Deanna

In reply to by Nicole (not verified)

Wed, 12/30/2015 - 16:52 Permalink

Hi Nicole,
It is pretty variable, but it could take up to 5 months. Some cases are either approved (or denied) in as little as a few weeks though, so don't get too discouraged.

Anthony (not verified)
Thu, 12/31/2015 - 04:23 Permalink

Hi I am a disabled veteran and draw SSDI. I am also the non-custodial parent to my 17 year old daughter. i pay my child support like clock work, but my friends ask me why does Social Security not pay my child support? I don't know what they are talking about. is this true? will the SSA award my daughter a monthly benefit? and if so, how do i get it started? I barely get by as i have been deemed unemployable by the VA. Thank you in advance.

Deanna

In reply to by Anthony (not verified)

Thu, 12/31/2015 - 13:37 Permalink

Hi Anthony,
That's not quite how it works. What they are talking about is an auxiliary benefit. Your daughter could receive up to 50% of your payments (yours will remain the same, don't worry). This does NOT always count as paying child support. That's always up to Child Services to decide. But if your daughter is 17, she will only be eligible for a year or less for these benefits anyway. You should look into it just to give your daughter a little additional help.

Liz (not verified)
Thu, 12/31/2015 - 12:29 Permalink

Can I re-file for SSI for my son if benefits were taken away for not reporting my income?

Anonymous (not verified)
Thu, 12/31/2015 - 13:51 Permalink

Y daughter's father receives disability. She is fifteen. Can she receive benefits?

Deanna

In reply to by Anonymous (not verified)

Thu, 12/31/2015 - 14:00 Permalink

Hi there,
She can, but only if her father is on SSDI benefits. If her father receives SSDI, she can in turn get about 50% of his payment in addition to what he receives every month. These are known as auxiliary benefits. If he's never worked and is only receiving SSI benefits, she will not be eligible for any auxiliary benefits.

La Donna (not verified)
Thu, 12/31/2015 - 18:22 Permalink

How can I find out if my daughter's father is receiving ssd

Bryan

In reply to by Jessica (not verified)

Wed, 03/30/2016 - 10:43 Permalink

Hi Jessica,
I would contact the SSA to find your pin, you can call them at 1-800-772-1213 and they would be able to help you with that there.

Pop (not verified)
Fri, 01/01/2016 - 10:26 Permalink

My granddaughter is 12 and was born with trisomy 21. Her parents have been told that their daughter does not qualify for SSI or Medicaid because his income is too high. They say she will be eligible at age 18! Why is the parent income level a qualifying factor for a child who will never outgrow or be cured from Down's?

Deanna

In reply to by Pop (not verified)

Mon, 01/04/2016 - 16:23 Permalink

Hi Pop,
This is a very sad situation that affects a lot of people. The reason is because SSDI is funded by taxpayers. So adults who become disabled have earned their benefits by paying SS taxes all their lives. SSI is a little different. It's not payed by taxes, so nobody has "earned" SSI benefits. Thus, it's a program only for the very needy.

Abbey (not verified)
Fri, 01/01/2016 - 16:49 Permalink

My daughter gets SSD from her dad. She doesn't live with him.
The SSA immediately contacted my number to giver her SSD benefits. Now almost 3 yrs I am thinking is she entitled to these benefits if she never lived with him.
She is disabled and was found disabled by SSA. This makes me nervous. Its been so many yrs. Pls ease my mind.

Thanks so much!

Deanna

In reply to by Abbey (not verified)

Mon, 01/04/2016 - 16:28 Permalink

Hi Abbey,
I'm afraid I don't quite understand your situation! Your daughter is on SSDI from her dad, but she's also disabled and is on SSI? What was the phone call about?

Mike (not verified)
Fri, 01/01/2016 - 21:12 Permalink

I will be traviling out of state with my wife who's has MS to get treatment. My question is if I give temporary guardianship of our two boys to her parents for those two months will she lose any benefits she receives for our children during those two months?

Deanna

In reply to by Mike (not verified)

Mon, 01/04/2016 - 16:29 Permalink

Hi Mike,
She definitely shouldn't. You can either continue to receive the income in your bank account like you do now and send it to her parents, or set it up so they receive the income for just two months. You can do that at your local SSA office.

Mike (not verified)

In reply to by Deanna

Mon, 01/04/2016 - 22:40 Permalink

Thank you very much for answering so quickly. This iswill make everything much easier for us.

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